Nov 25, 2008

Houston collector Marilyn Oshman talks about her Fida's paintng "Roots"

May 21st, 2006 - Houston collector Marilyn Oshman talks about her Fida's paintng "Roots" on sale at Sotheby's

Roots, one of Frida Kahlo's most memorable self-portraits, has belonged to Houston collector Marilyn Oshman for a quarter century. But Oshman has decided to put it on the auction block. Sotheby's, in New York, predicts that Roots will fetch $5 million to $7 million at its auction next week.
"Someone will get a great painting," said Peter Marzio, director of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, who speculates that in the current hot market, Roots could in fact bring as much as $14 million. "When we had it on view here, people were just crazy about it."
Roots, from 1943, goes on exhibit at Sotheby's on Saturday and is up for auction Wednesday. One of about 150 paintings and works on paper Kahlo created, it's one of her rare full-body self-portraits. Twelve inches by 20 inches, the oil-on-metal painting shows her lying on her side, her head supported by her right hand. Leafy roots grow out of her body into the rocky ground, symbolically nourishing, and being nourished by, the earth.
"I feel that it was a gift to live with a painting of such magnitude and power for all these years," Oshman said. "It was an emotional decision to sell it, but it's time to let her go."
Carmen Melian, director of Sotheby's Latin American art department, described Roots as "a superb example of the great introspection and beauty in Kahlo's work. It is from the period when her paintings are most finished, when her work is most mature." Though legendary in Mexico, Kahlo wasn't well-known in the United States until 1978, when her work appeared in a traveling overview of 45 paintings, including Roots. The show, organized by Chicago's Museum of Contemporary Art, stopped at the Blaffer Gallery of the University of Houston. There, Oshman encountered Kahlo's work for the first time. Oshman, whose family founded Oshman's Sporting Goods, served on the board of the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston from 1969 to 1978. Like other American art lovers at the time, Oshman was familiar with Rivera but knew nothing about Kahlo. "I was blown away by the paintings," she said. None was for sale. Like Rivera's and works of others, the works are considered national patrimony and required special export permits. Roots was one of several paintings on loan at the Blaffer from the Mexico City collection of Dolores Olmedo, a powerful figure in Mexican politics and art. She was one of Rivera's lovers and a trustee of his and Kahlo's estates. Olmedo sold Roots four years later through Mary-Anne Martin, whose New York gallery specialized in Latin American art. Oshman said she paid "five times" what she had paid for any work of art ever before, but nowhere close to its value now.

Source: http://www.fridakahlo.it/news7.html

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Nov 23, 2008

All About Frida! -- Part I

Frida Kahlo, Self-Portrait, 1940. See discussi...Image via Wikipedia
Arguably the most famous and influential female Mexican painter, Frida Kahlo, is celebrated and admired around the globe by a cult-like following.
In the last two decades an
explosion of Kahlo-inspired films, plays, calendars, and jewelry has
transformed the artist into a veritable cult figure.

http://www.fridakahlo.com/bio.shtml
This is the first part of a list of some interesting places where you can learn more about Frida Kahlo and enjoy her works of art in cyberspace.

"I paint self portraits because I am the person I know best." - Frida Kahlo



We should start with the Frida Kahlo Corporation official website (http://www.fkahlo.com/) where we may read her biography, admire her photographs, read related news amongst other things.



Learn about Frida's life, re-discover her famous paintings, visit the bookstore, film library and music shop at http://www.fridakahlo.com/.



PBS brings us a documentary exploring the life of this celebrated Mexican artist at http://www.pbs.org/weta/fridakahlo/ where you may also admire some of her works of art.



The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art website (http://www.sfmoma.org/exhibitions/310) offers a calendar of upcoming exhibitions and events if you happen to be in San Francisco, as well as a sample of its impressive collection and resources.



Offering an very comprehensive gallery of Frida's works of art http://www.fridakahlofans.com/ includes photographs, drawings, sketches and even an essay of her art.




A personal favorite http://www.fridakahlo.it/index.html contains links to permanent exhibitions in Mexico, critical essays, bibliography, and updated news on the artist. e


Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Nov 21, 2008

The Wounded Deer

Following the same theme, here is an interesting post on The Wounded Deer by Frida. You can see the original at:

http://www.fridakahlofans.com/c0540.html
In this painting
of a young stag fatally wounded by arrows, Frida expresses the disappointment
which followed the operation on her spine in New York in 1946, and which
she had optimistically hoped would cure her of her back pain.
 blog it

Frida With Deer

Found this beautiful picture while checking out Blogger!
blog it

Unofficial Guide to Friendfeed I

Great post on friendfeed by Mr Zee M Kane (http://thenextweb.com/2008/11/12/what-makes-friendfeed-special/). Here is an excerpt:
clipped from thenextweb.com

Friendfeed is a site that primarily focuses on aggregating all your online activities and using them to create your own personal lifestream. What many people don’t realise is how much more there is to the site and why it has caused such stir and devotion amongst those who frequently use it.

zee
Written on November 12, 2008 – 4:23 pm
Zee M Kane, Internet Marketer, Design Connoisseur & Web App Devotee


blog it

Image representing FriendFeed as depicted in C...
Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Nov 13, 2008

166 International Newspaper Front Pages Covering Obama's Win


The election made international news across the world, in Britain, Germany, Italy, France, Australia, Indonesia....the list goes on. Historic!

read more | digg story


Reblog this post [with Zemanta]